Lie low and exalt God

This is a lesson from my pastor’s sermon on Luke 10:1-24.

We like to see people get the credit they deserve. We don’t like to see anyone take credit for someone else’s efforts. Sometimes we should give credit to God, unlike the seventy-two disciples Jesus sent out ahead of him.

Jesus sent out the seventy-two with instructions about what to take, where to stay, what to say, and even how to respond if they were not received well. He told them to take no money or belongings and to stay in the same house the whole time, eating and drinking what the hosts provided. Why these odd instructions? Pastor Andrew said that God was giving them a “lay low” message. They were to take only what they needed and were not to draw attention to themselves.

When the seventy-two returned from their journey, they said, “Lord, even the demons submit to us in your name.” Jesus replied, “I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven. I have given you authority to trample on snakes and scorpions and to overcome all the power of the enemy; nothing will harm you. However, do not rejoice that the spirits submit to you, but rejoice that your names are written in heaven.”

In other words, the glory belongs to God!

As my pastor put it, God is lifted high when we lie low. God is exalted when we serve him with humility! When we focus on ourselves, when we seek attention and glory for ourselves, we are headed in the wrong direction.

When our focus moves to ourselves and how God is using us, we are headed the wrong direction. 

GotQuestions.org

Who were the seventy-two disciples in Luke 10? We aren’t told any of their names. Their names are not important. The important thing is that their names were written in heaven!

I confess that I am proud of myself when I do something good for others. Sometimes I even give in to the temptation to toot my own horn.

Lord Jesus, help me to be humble, to think of myself less. Thank you for reminding me to focus on you and to give the glory to you. I rejoice because my name is written in heaven!

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Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

Kinder, gentler, wiser

But where is it written that we must act as if we don’t care, as if we’re not moved. Well, I am moved. I want a kinder, gentler nation.

George HW Bush, 1988 speech

When I heard that George HW Bush passed away, I thought not about his politics but about his call to care about others. “I want a kinder, gentler nation,” he said. Bush knew that in caring about others, some would see softness and weakness. He cared anyway.

In the kinder, gentler speech, Bush said, “[p]rosperity with a purpose means taking your idealism and making it concrete by certain acts of goodness.” Thirty years later, America is still a prosperous nation.  Unfortunately, she is losing sight of her noble purpose. She is losing her goodness.

George Bush’s sentiments were at odds with those of the current president. Today, Americans are encouraged to be self-centered – to put America first. Today, Americans are urged to live in fear of others. Instead of celebrating a thousand points of light – selfless volunteerism – we’re building walls to keep others out. 

George Bush had a privileged upbringing yet he still lived a life of humility, a life of servant leadership. He understood that from those who have been given much, much will be demanded. He understood that from the one who has been entrusted with much, much more will be asked (Luke 12:48).

Kindness flows from wisdom, but as I think Bush understood, it is not the “wisdom” of the world. The world sees kindness and gentleness as weakness. The world teaches a false wisdom of selfish ambition and vain conceit. Those who subscribe to this way of thinking put themselves first, viewing others with an “us verses them” mindset. Instead of sowing unity and peace, they sow division and discord. Instead of practicing acts of goodness and kindness, they look only to their own interests. Instead of lifting others up, they tear others down. 

Kindness and gentleness, like all good virtues, flow from the wisdom of God. A person with heavenly wisdom sees the self realistically, with humility. It’s a wisdom born of pain, the ability to step into and share the feelings of others. Kind and gentle people value others above themselves, looking to their interests (Philippians 2:3-4). Those who are wise in God’s eyes, emulate Christ, clothing themselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience (Colossians 3:12).

Where is it written that we must act as if we don’t care, as if we are not moved? Where is it written that we should act out of selfish ambition? Well, I am moved and I want a kinder, gentler, wiser nation.

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Photo by Andrea Tummons on Unsplash